8 Barriers to SaaS Customer Engagement

by Trevor

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What stops customers from engaging with your SaaS?

If you have potential customers who come to your website and show interest in your product but don’t actually make the leap from prospect to full-fledged customer, it may be due to one of the following reasons:

Here’s a list of best practices for crafting a strong call to action. Subscribe to receive this extra resource.

They Don’t Have the Financial Resources

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One of the main reasons people do not purchase from you is because they simply don’t have the money to do so.

Is your product priced out of their budget?

While I’m not a big fan of competing with other businesses on price, I do think that you should understand who your target customer is and know exactly how much they’re willing to spend. That way you can create a price list that makes sense for your market.

This is the reason multiple tiers are such a popular payment model for Saas.

Without a doubt, you should offer different prices to the different groups of customers you have. If you haven’t already, look for ways to do just that.

But please remember that price automatically communicates value. The higher the price, the more value people will associate with it. While you should always make your price fit within your target customer’s budget, don’t strive to be the lowest offer.

They Don’t Have the Time

Is your SaaS complicated to learn or in some way time consuming?

While your customers may be excited to use your product initially, they can quickly become overwhelmed if there are a lot of moving parts. Plus there’s simply not enough time to learn. Your customers—just like you—are strapped for time. For this reason, many a free trial goes wasted.

The best way to combat this is by making an onboarding process that guides the user at a steady pace. It may make sense to automatically involve the user in an email series that is dispensed over the course of the trial and shows how to use your product.

They Don’t Trust You

I hate to break it to you but sometimes people stop engaging because they just don’t trust you.

The good news is that you can use basic visual elements to develop trust.

For example let’s take a look at your website design:

  • Is it easy to navigate?
  • Does it look good on mobile screens? (Most people are searching the Internet from their smartphones these days.)
  • Do you have social proof in the form of customer testimonials or logos of businesses that use your service?
  • Do you have easy access to frequently asked questions or a knowledge base?
  • Do you offer security certificates for credit card logos or even a 100% money back guarantee?

All of these things will help your customer trust you with their credit card.

Transparency also makes a difference. Some customers are interested to know where exactly the money goes when they pay you. The folks at Buffer have a completely transparent payment model. Buffer customers get to see exactly where their $10 per month goes. Check it out here: Buffer’s transparent pricing.

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Image Courtesy of Buffer

They Don’t Understand Your Product

Sometimes people simply do not understand how to use your product. They may think they know but once they get into the dashboard, they find themselves confused, bewildered, and maybe a little scared.

You don’t want that, they don’t want that, and luckily, there’s an easy solution out of that.

It’s called an email course.

I’m really surprised at the number of SaaS that do not offer an onboarding process via email.

I mentioned earlier that an onboarding email series can save time for your user. That’s the side benefit, but the main benefit is that it helps your user understand how to use your product to the fullest.

Don’t skip this step. It will help your customers feel empowered. It will also make them more likely to use your product when they know what the heck they’re actually doing.

They Don’t Know How You’re Different From Your Competition

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Maybe your customer gets your service, but what they don’t get is how you’re different or better than your chief competitor, Widgets R Us.

It’s your job to educate them.

Many smart SaaS create comparison pages right on their website. They may even create a separate mini site, such as www.comparingwidgets.com (I made that up just for this discussion) where they highlight the top brands, obviously skewing to their own brand as the best choice.

Of course you don’t want to do a hatchet job on your competition. It’s not about tearing down the competition, it’s explaining how you are unique and what you offer that your competitors may not.

They Don’t Know if Your Product Is Customizable

A lot of new customers want the option to customize your SaaS for their own business or purposes.

Adaptability is huge. Do you offer the ability to customize your service? If you do, make it a clear selling proposition on your landing page. Also make it a part of your onboarding process.

They Need to Test You Out

If you have a SaaS and you don’t offer a free trial you may be losing out. Come on, offer a free trial—all the cool kids are doing it.

Free trials help you introduce your service without risk. That lowers the barrier of entry for your customers.

Plus, it gives you something extra special: it gets people on your mailing list which you can then use to sell to them.

Demos are extremely important for any SaaS.

However, don’t let your trial linger too long. Depending on your service, 15 days offers enough time for your customers to sample your service.

They Don’t Know What to Do Next

If you have followed my advice, you’ve already inserted the trial user into an automated email course. When the trial is almost over, it’s time to show the users how to transition from trial to premium.

This is where a strong call to action makes the dream work. Be sure you that you guide them to their next step—don’t assume they’ll know what to do.

Speaking of which, don’t miss our downloadable resource on how to craft a compelling call to action that you can find below:

Here’s a list of best practices for crafting a strong call to action. Subscribe to receive this extra resource.

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